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, ed. thank you. and thanks to you at home for joining us this hour. after a day that will be remembered in this country forever. for awful reasons. to the people of weeks and months ahead." that was the word today from ron barber, who was shot and wounded in the mass shooting in tucson last year that killed six people and wounded 13, including the grievous wounding of congresswoman gabby giffords. ron barber, who took gabby giffords' seat in congress after she stepped down to deal with her injuries. he said today, "as those of us in tucson know, senseless acts such as these tear at the very fabric of a community." mark kelly, gabby giffords' husband said today, "i just spoke with gabby, and she sends her prayers from tucson." in oak creek, wisconsin, where four months ago there was another mass shooting at a sikh temple, another six people gunned down at that temple. a school superintendent there today told the local press that she cried when she heard the news out of newtown, connecticut. she said "we always think it can't happen here, and we pray fervently that
giffords' seat in congress after she stepped down to deal with her injuries. he said today, "as those of us in tucson know, senseless acts such as these tear at the very fabric of a community." mark kelly, gabby giffords' husband said today, "i just spoke with gabby, and she sends her prayers from tucson." in oak creek, wisconsin, where four months ago there was another mass shooting at a sikh temple, another six people gunned down at that temple. a school superintendent there today told the local press that she cried when she heard the news out of newtown, connecticut. she said "we always think it can't happen here, and we pray fervently that it won't. but as we know from our experience this summer, it can happen anywhere." the mayor of aurora, colorado, is still helping his community try to recover from the mass shooting there this summer where 12 people were shot and killed and another 58 people were shot but survived. he said today from aurora, "our hearts go out to the people of newtown." colorado's senator michael bennet said today, "as coloradans, we know how this type of tragedy can
firearms were used are evolving. what we do know is that the gunman's mother, nancy, was a kindergarten teacher it he school and is among those killed. with the death toll encompassing many of her kindergarten students, children 5 and 6 years old. an emotional president addressed the tragedy just a few moments ago. >> i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them, birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. these children are our children, and we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this regardless of the politics. >> the president speaking there of his grief, sharing his feelings as a father as well as a president. as the nation reels from the shock and grief of this unthinkable crime, with young children as the most tragic victims and witnesses. >> well, when i was out in the hall when like everybody hurried. the bullets
. in the coming weeks i'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this because what choice do we have? we can't accept events like this as routine. are we really prepared to say that we're powerless in the face of such carnage? that the politics are too hard? >> california senator dianne feinstein who wrote the assault weapons ban which was signed by president clinton in his first term and expired under president bush announced on "meet the press" yesterday that she will introduce a new version of that bill on day one of the new congress. >> it's a first day bill i'm going to introduce in the senate and the same bill will be introduced in the house, a bill to ban assault weapons. it will ban the sale, the transfer, the importation, and the possession not retroactively, but perspectively, and it will ban the same for big clips, drums, or strips of more than ten bullets, so there will be a bill -- >> today senator feinstein told andrea mitchell
watch over us amen >> reporter: dylan hockley was also 6. he loved the trampoline in his backyard. and madeline hsu. catherine hubbard. her middle name was violet. chase kowalski played baseball outside with his dad. jesse lewis learning to ride horses. james mattioli known for his smile. grace mcdonnell who was 7 went every morning to the bus stop with her mom. emelie parker of 6 who was a budding artist who always carried around markers and pencils. jack pinto already at 6 years old already had a team, the giants and a hero, star wide receiver victor cruz. noah pozner has a twin sister, ariel, who was assigned to a different classroom and survived. noah called her his best friend. caroline previdi played soccer and hide and seek. while jessica rekos as described by her parents for the little ceo for the way she thought out and planned everything. 6-year-old benjamin wheeler's family moved from queens, new york, to newtown, connecticut, for its promise of grassy lawns and good schools. that promise has been shattered. and last night newtown prayed with the help of the president.
massachusetts. mr. markey: and if barney frank was down here, none of us would have -- none of this would have happened in terms of the understanding of the parliamentary procedure. he was up there trying to grab an managenary microphone. . john oliver has been for us -- olver, has been for us an invaluable colleague. he taught so much to us. when he sat down with us talking about transportation, he explained our own districts to us as far as what was possible. on climate change, i talked to him for about 20 years. he was on this issue in the early 1990's and probably understood it probably even before that. he is that smart. he is that visionary in terms of the issues are essential not just to massachusetts, but to our planet. and it has been migrate honor to have served with you, john and to have called you my friend and colleague overall of these years and we thank you so much for what you have done for us and for the country and thank you. and with that -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. under the speaker's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from
johnson, thank you, sir, for joining us as well, and thank you cliff vanzandt. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz picks up msnbc's continuing coverage of the sandy hook elementary school shooting right now. >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york there are tragedies in life that shake our souls and break our hearts. today the nation experienced one of those tragedies. every american will struggle to come to grips with what happened today in a small community in connecticut. sandy hook elementary school in the small community of about 27,000 residents was the site of a shooting rampage. at this hour, we know 26 people at the school were shot and killed by a lone gunman. 20 of those deceased were children. surviving students and their parents said teachers ordered children to hide in closets. witnesses reported hearing dozens of shots, as many as 100 rounds. police found the shooter dead. officers never fired a shot. the gunman's mother was found dead at a newtown location where the gunman lived. police have re
scheduled a news conference for 1:00 eastern. joining us on the phone, msnbc analyst and former fbi profiler clint van zandt. clint, give us your read, your assessment, on this situation? >> well, we know that the shooter is dead. we don't know whether that is by law enforcement action when the first responding officers went in and confronted him or whether, as we saw in the portland, oregon, mall shooting this past week, whether the shooter actually shot himself committing suicide. we know that at least two handguns were found. you know, that takes us back to april 2007 when the shooter at virginia tech, in that case, who killed 32 and wounded 15, also had two handguns. what it does suggest, though, is that this individual went in there with carrying two handguns and perhaps other ammunition. he went in there apparently to confront someone. we're told that confrontation took place in the office of the school and may have spilled out from there. we're still trying to understand the number of victims and the level of injury. >> clint, you know, when we talk about these shootings, first off, t
right now. good morning, everyone, thanks so much for joining us bright and early great to be back with dave briggs, i've missed you for the past couple of weekends. >> you, too. >> alisyn: and wonderful to have you in, kelly, in for clayton. >> it's good to be back in this chair. >> julie: you and i both have kids the same age, 30, 40 minutes away from newtown in elementary school in a town very similar. this hit very close to home for us and for a lot of people. >> you know, based on that point, if it can happen in newtown and it can happen anywhere, in a small rural community and haggerstown, maryland, an idyllic community, town of 30,000, just likes newtown, and people are mourning and weeping as they mourn for the teachers at sanry hook elementary school. >> just when you think you can be composed and keep it together and maybe the tears will have stopped, they put out the names and ages of the victims and even not knowing them, but just to read through their names and their ages is just wretching. we will show you some of their names now, the victims, there were 12. we'll sh
, was used about the atf and people like george h.w. bush and norman schwartzcof resigned from the nra. with every horrible act that happens, it's taken too long, but the story of the country in many ways is of coming to a consciousness that is overdue. >> let's also talk, mika, about the financial incentives of the gun trade. >> well -- >> they're out there as well. this is not just about politics, it's not just about liberty, about a lot of money, too. >> the big thing that's happening here and you see that in the people who are speaking out and those who are not, there's a shift in attitudes, as the "new york times" puts in their headline today, i think will be lasting. i don't know how any -- there are several networks, not just ours, having trouble finding pro gun advocates to speak out because there's really nothing to say at this point. can you think of anything in your political career, where something has happened and you realize you just can't take -- >> 9/11. 9/11 happened and there were a lot of conservatives after 9/11 very wary, very suspicious of federal government expan
" magazine edward lindgren. jansing and company's chris jansing joins us now. you have been on the road a lot this year to some very terrible places in the wake of some very serious american tragedies, but this one, if i dare say it, seems a little bit different. give us your sense of your take on the move -- as far as the mood on the ground and how the community is reacting m days since the tragedy. >> alex, it would be difficult to even begin to try to express the depth and the breadth of the pain that this community is feeling and will feel all weeklong. the first of a series of funerals is getting underway right now. i'll show you a page from the local paper, and there are two pages of obituaries of children. we've just learned that governor dan malloy has shown up at the funeral of little noah, 6 years old, noah posner, who has a twin and an 8-year-old sister, and there was a heartbreaking question asked in his obituary. how do you capture the essence of a 6-year-old in just a few words? when i first came here on friday, alex, i was talking to the local priest. they lost ten young parish
of action. >> good morning, it's tuesday, december 18th. with us, we have mike barnicle, author of "thomas jefferson," willie, joe and me as well. >> that was fascinating, wasn't it? >> that was. that was dead serious. he was not feeling anything else at that point, i think. >> i tell you, yesterday really did touch americans in a way, this whole weekend, and the president's speech and people like joe manchin stepping forward, really, i think -- i think it's got americans talking, for the first time, on this issue, in a really surprising way. i was -- i was struck not by how many democrats or liberals called after the show and said, boy, we really liked what you guys did and the conversation was needed. i was struck by how many friends of mine from first baptist church in pensacola, florida, that are lifetime members of the nra, who went out hunting across northwest florida and alabama and georgia and mississippi, from the time they were 9, 10. jon meacham, you were raised in a similar culture. although you were wearing white gloves during your formative years. i'm sorry. i was struck that
, bob doll will be giving us his lineup for stocks. that's coming up at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive. david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will join us to give us some of his wisdom in a kaerc t can't-miss interview. a lot to talk about with him. in the meantime, why don't we get to some of today's top stories. we could see some movement in the fiscal cliff negotiations. house speaker boehner offering to raise the top tax rates on those making over $1 million a year as well as other measures amounting to $1 trillion in new revenue. that's in exchange for an equal amount in spending cuts. the white house has not yet accepted the proposal. >>> also, apple says it has sold more than 2 million in iphone 5s in china just over the last three days. that's the best ever debut for the iphone line in china. apple is china's second biggest market, although it did lose a lot of market share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>
they operate. they have stifled meaningful discussion by using fear and intimidation tactics to keep people from saying the things that maybe need to be said. >> our thanks to terry moran. >>> next up, the man who says the nra is not as powerful as you might think. new york city mayor michael bloomberg on his campaign to demand a plan from president obama. so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. ♪ first rule of taking the world by surprise? do something the world will actually notice. introducing the entirely new ford fusion. with a turbo-charged ecoboost engines and a hybrid that doubles the fuel economy of the average vehicle. it's an entirely new idea of what a car can be. [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein i
of hillary clinton's security advisory board. thank you both for joining us this evening. >> thanks for having us on. >> eliot: steve let me start with you. after the way the president had reinforced susan rice, not only saying an attack on her is an attack on me at a press conference, the scripted applause and his statements about her at a cabinet meeting just recently, this seems like such a sharp u-turn and you heard me say a few moments ago seems as though the president caved. am i wrong about that? what do you understand to be going on here? >> well, i think it was. i think susan described it accurately. she's a very capable and competent woman who would have, i think done a great job as secretary of state. that said, it is a distraction. it has been a distraction. when jonathan karl asked the president what he thought of john mccain and lindsey graham's comments, i actually happened to be hosting the meeting that that happened at, it started a spark and you had a number of senators, john barossi was one susan
much. >> that's it for us tonight. it's been an extraordinary year. thank you for watching. >>> tonight the biggest names in politics. >> word peace is something almost become fashion. >> headline makers. >> if the president didn't know what happened, he sure as hell should have. >> candidates. >> i was the perfect candidate for america. >> what if mitt romney isn't the best person? >> the idea that somehow making a business profitable is different than helping people. >> it's ridiculous for people to purchase a gun. >> did you get up this morning and have a quick -- >> i probably did, i probably did. >> "piers morgan tonight: the newsmakers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers, the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from some of my favorite guests. we'll begin with the big man himself, governor chris christie. he found himself in a bit of hot water for making nice with president obama
there, and they are analyzing that to see what they can get out of it. >> what can you tell us about what happened if what was the scenario? >> well, it all starts friday morning when he takes his mother's guns. she had purchased them legally. this is a woman who grew up in rural new hampshire, comfortable with guns, collected them. he killed her. takes three of the guns to the school. drives there in her car. forces his way in, apparently by shattering a window. they had a buzzer system. he forced his way in. the principal and the school psychologist tried to stop him. he killed them. and then concentrated his firepower on two classrooms with devastating effect. and, david, the detail that was show sho so shocking is he used an assault-style weapon. a term that bothers some people. but a bushmaster 223, the same weapon that the washington snipers used 10 years ago, and shot these children several times, some as many as 10 and 11 times. so you can only imagine the devastating effect that that had. >> the shooter, adam lanza, who took his own life. we have an older picture of him, the
last be enough. millions of americans hope that is true. but it's not enough for us to hope. we have to speak up. we have made our voices heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without action from washington, it will be a stain upon our nation's commitment to protecting the innocence innocent including our children. >> rose: i'm pleased to have mayor bloomberg back at this table. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: on "meet the press" yesterday, at a press conference today you believe that the time is now, that this is the moment to act, and at the same time you are chastising the president for-- i believe the time was a long time ago, the president gave a speech after the massacre in a-- aurora, colorado, saying we have to do something. here we are two years later, another 21,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virgini
restrictions and signs of a possible shift in public attitudes, about access to the weapons like the rifle used in connecticut, the national rifle association instead called for putting more armed security officers in the nation's schools. the. >> the onlying that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. >> reporter: the nra's wayne la pierre says children in most schools are defenseless because the schools proclaim to be places without guns. >> they tell every insane killer in america that schools are the safest place to inflict maximum mayhem with minimum risk. >> reporter: he took no questions from reporters but was interrupted by protesters. >> shame on the nra! >> reporter: la pierre tried to anticipate criticism tham having more guns is not the answer. >> why is the idea of a gun good when it is used to protect the president of our country? or our police? but bad when it is used to protect our children in our schools? >> reporter: gun control advocates say the nra's idea won't be effective. they note would armed security officers could not stop the columbine shooting in 1999.
was in a gym, and i heard a loud -- well, i heard, like, seven loud booms, and the gym teachers told us to go in the corner, so we all huddled, and i kept hearing these booming noises, and we all started -- well, we didn't scream. we started crying. so all the gym teachers told us to go into the office where no one could find us, so then a police officer came in and told us to run outside, so we did, and we came in the firehouse and waited for our parents. >> there were other eyewitnesss, other children also responding. >> is he with her, thank god, and they went into a corner, and they didn't move until they found out what happened and the principal was killed and some other people were shot, and i don't know anything else. >> susan paige and david gregory here with me in the studio as we watch these scenes unfold and we're waiting for law enforcement news conference. david, as the father of three children, three young children, you know that schools are now in a completings completely different zone preparing for these kinds of emergencies, and teaching children how to deal with it. >> that
stand up and do was's right for us. >> rose: each day 34 americans are murdered by guns. >> yes. >> rose: this is what you call for. congress passing the fix gun checks act. >> yup. >> rose: which would close a loophole. >> well, 40% of the guns-- let me step back. congress voted some laws to be tough. congress always does this. they're so tough, for those that were sorry about a massacre, they voted no guns in the hands of criminals or drug addicts or psychiatric problems, people with psychiatric problems or minorities. and then, of course, they don't fund it they don't fund the enforcement so they can say to both sidesness don't worry about t i'm with you babes, but both sides. 40% of the guns that are sold in this country are sold either over the internet or at gun shows and the federal law-- the federal laws don't cover that, so you have to change that law. that is one thing that congress should do. and that's this gun check act. second, they've got to pass a ban on assault weapons. you know, the founding fathers never thought about assault weapons. they were talking about a militia,
, and residents are telling us they felt surrounded. >> and when it come down, we looked and everything seemed green like it was popped off transformers left and right. we heard a noise, and then all of a sudden i took off and off and started walking down here. >> i prayed to god as loud as i could and, i was just praying for my safety. i knew that the truck was knew the truck was shaking. i just prayed that the truck stay put and that god would protect me. jamie: a lot of praying going on in that part of the country. they're used to this kind of weather, but just not now. mother nature is also taking a toll on the midwest. take a look at this, snow and ice-covered roads have forced residents to stay indoors. they're patiently waiting for the storm to pass, at least we hope so. news extreme weather center. i'm surprised, maria when we look at video how many people are on the roads. that's crazy. >> stay home today. stay home with your families if you don't have to go to work. those conditions are dangerous not just across the midwest but as we head later tonight and during evening rush and ove
remarks that allowed as how the militia was a useful thing to have. he couldn't have bit the continental army without the existence of the militias and people who had been in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: people were using these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting, and then in the colonies, some sense of responsibility nor the common good. >> guest: the command law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: local commanders, towns. they had them in new england, certainly. later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities authorie colonists, in the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans -- we knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time was there organized law enforcement? these communities? or was in effect this group of volunteers or
in italy. he became the first japanese american in congress and served 50 years in the u.s. senate. his death was announced by harry reid. >> the kindness that he has shown me for me time here in the senate has been something i will cherish always. a man who has lived and breathed the senate. he was that patriot. >> very kind words. president obama also a native of hawaii tweeted aloha yesterday. he died yesterday at 88 years old. >>> there is progress in talks on the fiscal cliff, but major sticking points still remain with just two weeks to go. a top republican says there is disagreement over spending cuts versus new taxes and until that could be worked out, there won't be any talks about the specific details. and wall street closed higher over signs of the talks. the dow jones rose 100 points for its biggest gain of the month. early markets overseas also higher because of capitol hill optimism. and a bounce back in china's economy. >>> a holiday miracle for drivers as plunging gas prices hit their lowest point of the year. aaa reports the price of gas fell more than nine cents a gall
and apparently at that decideded to take his own life. >> what else, michelle can you tell us about those final moments before adam lanza decided to kill himself? >> reporter: well, those are certainly the detailsa we're hoping that we'll learn about, perhaps at this press conference or in the coming days, exactly the length that adam lansa had to this school, in fact what happened, perhaps they'll have a little bit better timeline. when first responders and law enforcement arrived on scene, they arrived to a very active shooter situation, a very chaotic situation and of course what was left behind is just devastating in terms of what they had to cope and deal with in terms of not just the emotions of this, but also processing that crime scene. so that they're say whether take the most time. >> the stories of heroism that happened inside sandy hook elementary school. the teacher who for all intents and purposes risked her life in an attempt to save the lives of her children there. and i do want to call our viewer's attention to the left side of the screen here, president obama who is at andrews
on these two classrooms with devastating effect. the detail that was so shocking is that he used an assault style weapon, a bushmaster .223, the same weapon that the washington snipers used ten years ago and shot these children several times, sometimes as much as 11, 12 times. >> the shooter adam lanza who took his own life. we have an older picture of him, it's the only picture that exists. what more do you know about him? >> this is a young man who had a mild form of autism and was always a person apart, never had any close friends, never seemed to be a good fit anywhere, his mother took him in and out of school, homeschooled him for a while. his parents got divorced, he stayed with his mother but obviously the friends of his mother, neighbors say there was a great strain there. unlike other kids who had backpacks, he always had a briefcase, he had trouble looking people in the eye, he had trouble fitting in or answering questions. so it was a very difficult time for him and his mother. >> i would think in the days and weeks ahead the immediate focus will be on what can be learned from th
give us an idea of what we're learning, what new facts have we acquired? >> from the time, chris, went off the air last night, we saw a large exodus from the area around the school. we can stationed very nearby at the staging area which is in a local firehouse. and we began to see some of the coroner's vehicles leave. we saw four cars in a row with priests in them. we spoke with lieutenant vance who told me all of the identifies have been made. and all of the families have been officialed notified. the medical examiners' team did work through the night and into the early morning hours. obviously, this is a situation where you want to make sure that you have everything absolutely right. and some of those identifications were difficult. they have described this shooter as chillingly accurate. of course, all the people who were shot, only one survived and was taken to danbury hospital. and there are also obviously a lot of questions we have. we are hoping to get those identifications this morning. i know that lieutenant vance has been working on them throughout the morning, again torsi ma
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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